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I tried wheelchair rugby and it was #BRUTIFUL !

January 19, 2020

The knot in my stomach tightened, my legs felt like lead, I’m so rubbish at sports. I walked up to Britannia Leisure Centre. I’ve never played rugby. I’ve never been in control of a wheelchair. What if I humiliate myself, let my team down? Nobody will want me in their team. I’ve already arrived late.

I opened the swing doors to the sports hall, sports noise blasted out at me: a referee whistle, cheers, clapping and laughter. I felt a buzz of excitement. I had arrived at the Bolt Burdon Kemp wheelchair rugby event.

A few days before, I had been thumping away at my computer, I work from home and I was feeling quite isolated. My email inbox pinged. ‘ooh a non-work email!’ an invitation

“I am emailing to check whether you may be available and would like to attend the Wheelchair Rugby event organised by Bolt Burdon Kemp… I have played wheelchair rugby before and loved every minute of it! The event is run by Wheelchair Rugby Experience who take into account different levels of abilities to ensure that wheelchair rugby can be enjoyed by everyone. It can also give a great insight into what it means to be a wheelchair user… if this is of interest to you, it would be great to see you there!”

I didn’t hesitate. “yes. Yes. Yes please !”

“Wonderful” was the reply “see you there. “

I Googled Wheelchair Rugby Experience…

The day, lead and run by Paralympians, will provide a competitive day with a focus on specific issues of trust building, decision-making, communication, leadership, honesty, problem-solving, and change management. This experience will challenge your team’s dynamics and encourage self-reflection as well as being great fun. It is shaped completely with you in mind and we will guide you through building your Wheelchair Rugby Experience.

wheelchair rugby experiene buildmumahouse
©www.wheelchairrugbyexperience.com

As soon as I arrived and I was welcomed by staff from Bolt Burdon Kemp and my nerves melted away. The event was so well organised and the atmosphere was warm and supportive. I was allocated my team colour, introduced to my team mates and we were each given a pair of gloves. Now for the safety briefing and introduction to wheelchair rugby!

Rugby wheelchairs are something out of Mad Max! Steel and structural, they are designed with a metal hoop around the base, protecting your legs and feet when in rugby ‘combat.’ The wheels and every detail have been designed to protect you and keep you upright so that you can feel safe and that you too, can smash and tackle fearlessly.

I learnt that the gloves were not just to keep my hands from blistering. They helped me grip the wheels of the wheelchair, and helped me to spin the wheels and try and go as fast as possible…and also when in a manoeuvre to tackle opponents.

Keep your arms away from the wheels or you will get friction burns!

This is how you pick the ball off the floor and this is how you ride with the ball on your lap.

Suddenly the whistle blows and we’re off! Of course I was not as rubbish as I thought I would be, of course I felt safe in the design of the wheelchair. I was having fun and doing my best to do my bit for the team. On the side lines, keeping an eye on the game and the players, whizzing over to help, advise, encourage, give tactical advice were the professionals. 

Game one was over. Everyone from both teams, wheeled around and we did high fives, shook hands “well done” gripped each other’s arms. We were all equals, we looked each other in the eye and laughed “great game.”

I wheeled over to the side line. I stood up and walked away from the wheelchair and suddenly as I went to share a joke with a team mate I felt very vulnerable. Today I could stand up and walk away, skip about and run but there were team mates that I had just played with and they couldn’t. They were busy transferring into their own wheelchairs. 

The day tournament was organised by Bolt Burdon Kemp – BBK – a firm of solicitors who specialise in a range of cases including serious injury claims. During the day I had some really insightful conversations with their solicitors and their colleagues about their work. BBK represent people who have sustained brain injury, spinal injury and they deal with medical negligence and accident claims. I began to realise how complex injury cases are in terms of the legal proceedings and how passionately they represent their clients. Each of the solicitors I spoke to had a detailed knowledge of their area of specialism, not just in terms of the law, but also the medical facts. What made me really stop and think was when they explained to me the impact on a person’s life, physically, mentally and how a family is impacted not just financially. I also spoke to a few people in our teams who had had life changing injuries. We spoke about how their lives had changed, their legal battles. I heard how one person who, experiencing the Invictus Games, had been inspired and motivated, leading them to train and become an athlete at an international level.

My Wheelchair Rugby experience totally blew me away. I met some fantastic people, we laughed, we pulled stomach muscles, I was totally outrun by team mates who were disabled and wheelchair users. I experienced how it feels when a room is not wheelchair friendly or a conversation goes on above your head. Most of all, I realised how important the support of a team is and how sport lifts us all.

A great day, we all won. 

Bolt Burdon Kemp are specialist claims solicitors covering brain injury, spinal injury, military claims, abuse claims, medical negligence and accident claims.

Make someone happy. Make ’em Polish chicken soup.

January 13, 2020

Yes, it’s true, Polish chicken noodle soup IS Polish penicillin. Make it because it’s warming, it’s comforting, it awakens the appetite, it’s good for young fussy eaters, it’s good for anyone who is unwell and it’s delicious when you are feeling happy or like me today with a case of the Sunday Blues. We call it Rosół- that’s pronounced ro-soow.

This recipe is my version of chicken noodle soup that I make for my family or friends; my mum makes her version, my dad made his, my grandmas made theirs and my son makes his own. My dad’s golden rule was that it has to be eaten a soon as its ready and can’t be reheated. My mum’s rule was that she cooked it (with loads of sweet carrots) before  I arrived with her grandson  so that she could give it to him for his mid morning meal… after I had finally left them alone.

This recipe is my version that is perfect for taking over to a friend or relative who needs…some chicken noodle soup. Its full of vitamins, micro nutrients from the vegetables and the chicken bones and chicken liver but it just tastes light and savoury and sweet. It’s umami on a spoon. I can only get all the right ingredients for myself from the Polish Shop in Streatham. But as almost every High Street in the UK has a Polski Sklep, I will point you in the right direction so that you can get the right stuff too!

Ok here goes:

In the veg area of the Polski Sklep find a bundle of vegetables called WLOSZCZYZNA (V-WOZH-CHEEZNA)

chicken soup veg

At the meat counter let them know you are buying chicken and ingredients for RO-SOOW and you will get exactly the right ingredients. Half a large chicken: these used to be called boilers in England, chicken gizzards and chicken liver, if they have chicken necks, just take those too!

Rosol ingredients
Wloszczyzna veg bundle, chicken gizzards, onion, chicken livers, chopped carrot, peppercorns and pack of egg vermicelli noddles
for roll
Flat leaf parsley and diced carrot

Chicken Noodle Soup Recipe

Ingredients:

Half a large chicken (bones included and don’t remove any fat)

1 small washed wloszczyzna bundle

1 large Spanish sweet onion or 2 large shallots, peeled and whole

150 grams chicken livers, washed

150 grams chicken gizzards, washed

2 Large handfuls of egg vermicelli noodles

1-2 carrots finely diced

Half teaspoon of peppercorns

Salt to taste

OR Optional: half a Knorr stock cube

Equipment:

For the soup – Large pasta saucepan with lid or a large saucepan and a slotted spoon

For the noodles – Small saucepan and a sieve

Vegetables and herbs – Sharp knife and chopping board

For taking to a friend or family:

4 small bowls

A large glass jug, or an earthenware bowl

Clingfilm

For serving at home:

Soup bowls

OK Let’s Do it:

In a large saucepan of cold water boil up the half chicken, gizzards and liver. I use my pasta saucepan for rosol as this makes it easy to lift out all of the meat and veg out of the cooked soup at the end. Take this to a rolling boil and skim off the brown foam until it all looks clear. Add the onion or shallots, peppercorns, whole carrots, parsnip and chunk of celeriac.

Use a stock pot or a spaghetti saucepan

Simmer for half an hour.

Add most of the bunch of flat leaf parsley, including the stalks. Carry on simmering for another 30-40 minutes

Add a small bundle of flat leaf parsley
Add a small bundle of flat leaf parsley
rosol Polish Chicken soup
Carry on simmering with the lid on

In the meantime, add 2 handfuls of egg vermicelli noddles to a small saucepan half full with boiling water. Boil for  2-4 minutes, strain and immediately cool down by running cold water over them. Drain and then set aside in a small dish.

Strain, cool down and then drain the egg noddles
Strain, cool down and then drain the egg noddles

Check the flavour of the soup and add salt to taste, sometimes I add half a Knorr chicken stock cube but that is optional. If you don’t have Knorr, don’t bother.

Chop the flat leaf parsley leaves and put into a small bowl.

By now the chicken soup should look clear and golden, smell and taste good. The meat should be falling off the bones and all vegetables very soft but not falling apart.

Remove all the ingredients, if you are using a pasta pan just lift the strainer out and let it drain, otherwise lift out the meat and vegetables carefully with a slotted spoon and put to one side.

Keep the remaining broth on a low heat, add the diced raw carrot and allow to cook. When the carcass has cooled,  pick off the meat and place into a small serving bowl. When cooked, strain the chopped carrot and add to a bowl. If you like extra vegetables, dice one of the cooked carrots and a parsnip for serving as well.

Ready for packing up...
Ready for packing up…

Arrange the cold ingredients: noodles, diced carrots, chicken meat pieces, raw but chopped flat leaf parsley in separate bowls and cover with cling film or lids.

Pour the cold chicken soup into a jug and cover with a lid or cling film and you’re ready to go…

Serving:

Heat the soup to almost boiling. In soup plates or bowls spoon some noodles, chicken meat and carrots. Pour the hot soup over, sprinkle with flat leaf parsley

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

YUM!

When people are in pain or unwell the thing that makes all the difference is human kindness.

Decluttering! Where do I start??

January 5, 2020
how to declutter your kitchen home life

On December 31st 2019 at 6pm I sat down with a glass of water and I decided to lose weight, get fit and organise my life in 2020. I had spent the day looking at social media friends galloping around the British countryside, taking fabulous photos of trees and interesting ‘things’ or grinning in country pubs. If I had posted pictures of my day you would have seen me elbow high in jumpers, rolling knickers the Marie Kondo way, sorting long and short leggings and packing away summer clothes.

January 1st: I got to bed at 2 am, got up at 8am, walked the dogs, poured myself a cup of coffee, the phone rang and next thing I knew I was heading over to my mum’s to help her out. No more time or energy for my stuff.

Decluttering! My New Year’s Resolution failing already. Where do I start??

Would you believe it… Instagram. 2nd January 2020: I found out that Ashley Jordan, the one and only @fairygodperson, is going to grant my wish for a tidy home and mind. Ashley is posting a decluttering tip or job a day for 30 days on her Instagram, Facebook and LinkedIn feeds. These are bite sized jobs that will build up, so that by the end of January our clutter will be under control and we can all focus on stress free living. Today, I spoke to Ashley and asked about her New Year’s Resolution campaign that’s going to help us all to de-clutter and reclaim our space in 2020.

30 days to declutter your home on Instagram with @fairygodperson

“Time to sort out your fridge!”

@fairygodperson Day 1 – 2nd January

When I read the first tip and did it, I felt a real sense of achievement. A planned declutter of my home, taking it one step at a time, is really going to help me get freed up the stress of thinking ‘I’ve done this and that for others but I haven’t even done my own home’. Doing that one little thing on day one really helped me clear out the dregs of Christmas and helped me to free up my stress levels. Ashley who has devised the 30 day declutter campaign is a professional organiser. I asked her how she came up with this plan that really understands what we are looking for a the start of a new year?

“January is always my busiest time of the year. People’s …New Year’s resolution is to do a clear out …it’s what’s been annoying them. They’re thinking ‘Right, got to tackle it. I’ve got to get my house in order’ “.

“I’m running this across Instagram. LinkedIn and Facebook. I’m reaching out to young professionals…to the children of parents who might be moving, or people who need to organise their own home so they can help their parents better. I can help everyone get organised.”

The biggest thing that people say to me when they want to do a clutter clear – I didn’t know where to start… The essence of these 30 days of tips is helping people know where to start because it breaks it down for them. Where do I begin? At the beginning!

“I do know that people are not going to do everything.. they are going to be at work or doing things on some days so they can’t do everything that I suggest because some of these tips will be a big job that takes a whole day. At least it’s there to do in the future. This will help people to break it down.”

“my specific thing is helping in people’s homes, helping them to de-clutter or to help when people are downsizing or moving home.”

I asked Ashley how she discovered she had the superpower of organising.

She told me that working in offices she found that when she started to look at the systems and ways of working she naturally re-organised and set up systems that made everything easier and saved money, she would tell her employers “…why things weren’t working and how they can work better and I was always able to re-organise everything ”

Ashley set up One Stop Organisers to “organise things for other people and over the years it’s morphed into being specifically for the older generation and people with disabilities…the house move side of things for them and making their space…work better.”

“When I first started I was helping my best friend and her husband …with filing and sorting out their paperwork… and he designed my logo adding a halo because “I thought about how it make me feel when you’ve been in. I feel so much at peace, you have been angelic. It’s as if you have waved your magic wand.”

My ideal client is someone who is downsizing, over 65, downsizing from a large home into something smaller and they don’t know where to start, because they have probably lived in that house for 20, 30, 40, 50 years.

Ashley told me about the stress of de-cluttering, how she helps people get through the stress of deciding what to get rid of when de-cluttering and downsizing and about the moments of satisfaction when a job is done.

You must also find some moments of joy? Finding something you had forgotten about, awakening really good memories.

“Absolutely. I find people stories of their lives. Because you are going around their home decluttering …every part of their house has a story. I find it a privilege to be able to find out what those stories are as we go round, and people have that space to talk about their life and all the things that they have done.”

But right now I’m on Day 2 and loving Ashley’s advice, it’s really simple and has left me feeling really positive that, with her help, I can make this New Year’s resolution a reality: “As with your fridge, make sure that like things are stored like with like and use baskets and storage trays so things are easier to find and get out. Storage jars are great if you have a lot of room but if you don’t then they will take up more room than they save. Instead keep packets in them and then you can have 2 or 3 half packets in one.”

It’s never too late to start on the One Stop Organiser’s 30 day Clutter Campaign, you can catch up by clicking on one of these links: Instagram, LinkedIn and Facebook. Once you have completed a declutter job, share your comments and post photos of your achievements. See you on the @fairygodperson sites!

Make a Parkinson’s Fidget Cushion by Juliet Bawden, My Guest Blogger from creativecolour.org

December 18, 2019
creative colour, Juliet Bawden, how to make a fidget cushion, Buildmumahouse, Alzheimers aids, Alzheimers, Autism communciation aid, sensory cushion, how to make a sensory cushion, what is a sensory cushion, Parkinsons aid, aging in place, caring for carers

“My aunt has Parkinson’s disease, a complex condition that affects different people in different ways. The symptoms most often associated with Parkinson’s affect movement. My aunt often needs to do something with her hands and so I decided to make a Fidget and sensory cushion for her. When my children were very young I designed an activity cushion complete with buttons, laces, Velcro for them, so this is a similar idea but for an elderly person.”

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Juliet Bawden Fidget Cushion – back

I’ve invited Juliet Bawden from https://creativecolour.org/ to write about her fidget and sensory cushion, and share step-by-step instructions how she made this brilliant gift for her aunt on my blog. This fidget cushion has proved to be a simple and well designed item for her aunt, and it would be good for anyone with Parkinsons. Juliet’s Fidget Cushion can also be personalised to make a sensory cushion for reducing anxiety and agitation for someone living with Alzheimers, it can be adapted to be an activity cushion, an aid to stimulate communication between family, carers and a person living with dementia, Alzheimers or even Autism.

When Juliet was developing and then making this Fidget Cushion I would look forward to catching up with her. I learnt so much about how she was addressing her aunt’s needs with the design and how Juliet worked to improved the cushion’s functionality. I was as delighted as she was when it was finished…it proved to be a big hit not only with her aunt but with her aunts’ friends too.

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Juliet Bawden Fidget Cushion – both sides are full of interest and stimulation.

 

 

Fidget Cushion by Juliet Bawden from creativecolour.org

“This is my prototype, and as I write it is about to be road tested by my aunt. I became so excited by all the materials that I gathered together that this cushion has a back and a front to it. This maybe overkill so I suggest you only make a front to the cushion so that there is a flat surface to lay on the recipient’s lap.

My aunt’s symptoms include memory loss, so I felt that as well as giving her something to do with her hands It was important to engage all the senses. Sounds, smell, touch, sounds all help to plug in to their memories.

I read a report by someone on the internet, who makes these cushions for different clients. Her wise advice is to use textured fabrics and embellishments to occupy restless hands plus a clear pocket to add a photo, memo or reminiscence item.

The cushion is made from recycled materials so hopefully the planet, the charity shops, my bank account and my aunt will all benefit – not forgetting me, who enjoyed making it.

I bought a cushion that did up at the front with buttons. I chose garments and haberdashery made from contrasting fabrics and materials. The instructions given below are to make the Fidget Cushion shown here, however yours will be different from mine depending on what materials you can find.

You will need

Cushion with a cushion pad

Stitch ripper

Scissors

Sewing machine

Pins

Needle

Threads

 

Some or all of the below :

Shirt with pockets and placket

Garments or old cushions with applique or other decorative details

Pieces of ribbons and lace

Shiny buttons

Zip

Long silky scarf

2 x Small square silky scarves

Small furry teddy or letter or number

Lavender bag

Bells

Materials – look out for a variety of textures and colours

Instructions

These instructions are specific to the cushion I made and yours will be different depending on the bits and pieces you find.

 

 

Everything is based on this embroidered cushion with a button opening.

  • Step 1 Cut two pockets from a shirt leaving a 1 cm seam allowance so you can sew the pockets into place. Cut down the side seams of the cushion so that the front is separate from the back and you don’t inadvertently sew through two layers at once. Sew the pockets into place on the front as in the photograph.

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Cut pockets and backing off shirt

  • Step 2 Remove a zip from a dress. Insert it between two pieces of contrast cloth to make a zipped pocket. Sew this on the back of the cushion.

    creative colour, Juliet Bawden, how to make a fidget cushion, Buildmumahouse, Alzheimers aids, Alzheimers, Autism communciation aid, sensory cushion, how to make a sensory cushion, what is a sensory cushion, Parkinsons aid, aging in place, caring for carers

    Remove the zip from a dress

  • Step 3 Remove flowers from a child’s dress and sew these onto the cushion front.

    creative colour, Juliet Bawden, how to make a fidget cushion, Buildmumahouse, Alzheimers aids, Alzheimers, Autism communciation aid, sensory cushion, how to make a sensory cushion, what is a sensory cushion, Parkinsons aid, aging in place, caring for carers

    Remove flowers from child’s dress

  • Step 4 Cut away flat flowers from a child’s dress sew these onto the cushion back.

    creative colour, Juliet Bawden, how to make a fidget cushion, Buildmumahouse, Alzheimers aids, Alzheimers, Autism communciation aid, sensory cushion, how to make a sensory cushion, what is a sensory cushion, Parkinsons aid, aging in place, caring for carers

    Cut away the flowers

  • Step 5 Adding a 1cm seam allowance, cut the placket from the front of the shirt and neaten. Cut 10 cm pieces of ribbon and fold in half, pin them onto the cushion front with the base of the placket on top. Sew the placket and ribbon loops onto the cushion front and popper on the other piece.

    creative colour, Juliet Bawden, how to make a fidget cushion, Buildmumahouse, Alzheimers aids, Alzheimers, Autism communciation aid, sensory cushion, how to make a sensory cushion, what is a sensory cushion, Parkinsons aid, aging in place, caring for carers

    Neaten edge of placket

  • Step 6 Applique hearts cut from a different cushion, onto your cushion.

    creative colour, Juliet Bawden, how to make a fidget cushion, Buildmumahouse, Alzheimers aids, Alzheimers, Autism communciation aid, sensory cushion, how to make a sensory cushion, what is a sensory cushion, Parkinsons aid, aging in place, caring for carers

    Applique hearts onto cushion cover

  • Step 7 Make a small lavender bag and sew that onto one of the pieces of ribbon and place it in a pocket. Attach other items, like the soft number 8 in our picture, by pieces of ribbon so that they can be taken out but not lost.

    creative colour, Juliet Bawden, how to make a fidget cushion, www.Buildmumahouse, Alzheimers aids, Alzheimers, Autism communciation aid, sensory cushion, how to make a sensory cushion, what is a sensory cushion, Parkinsons aid, aging in place, caring for care

    Sew a lavender bag onto the ribbon

  • Step 8 We attached 2 scarves in the side seams. So that they could be knotted together or tied in a bow.

    creative colour, Juliet Bawden, how to make a fidget cushion, Buildmumahouse, Alzheimers aids, Alzheimers, Autism communciation aid, sensory cushion, how to make a sensory cushion, what is a sensory cushion, Parkinsons aid, aging in place, caring for carers

    Attach two silken scarves

  • Step 9 Turn the cushion cover inside out and sew the side seams together catching the edges of the placket and the scarves in the seams. As the cushion has a flap turn it through this to the right side out.

creative colour, Juliet Bawden, how to make a fidget cushion, Buildmumahouse, Alzheimers aids, Alzheimers, Autism communciation aid, sensory cushion, how to make a sensory cushion, what is a sensory cushion, Parkinsons aid, aging in place, caring for carers

Since writing this. The fiddle or fidget cushion has been road tested by my aunt and many others in her care home and it is very popular.

 

creative colour, Juliet Bawden, how to make a fidget cushion, Buildmumahouse, Alzheimers aids, Alzheimers, Autism communciation aid, sensory cushion, how to make a sensory cushion, what is a sensory cushion, Parkinsons aid, aging in place, caring for carers

Juliet Bawden Fidget and Sensory Cushion

Juliet Bawden is a designer, maker, author and journalist has written over 70 craft books either exploring and making the things herself. 
Recently designing, making and writing for magazines including : Coast, Simply Sewing and Reloved as well as for the web site of both Cath Kidston and Laura Ashley. Juliet has run workshops at the Fashion and Textile Museum for Heals, King makers of Candy Crush and many others.
Juliet is also a colour consultant and explores and writes about colour and craft on her blog: Creative Colour a UK design, craft and interiors blog.

Some of the techniques and others can be found in Juliet’s latest book, read my review here.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Calculate BTU or how to choose the right size radiator.

December 2, 2019

How do you calculate the correct size of radiator for each room?

Getting the right size radiator for your room will save money and also help you keep an even temperature in your home. The rule of thumb seems to be to install radiators that are just a bit more powerful than your calculation so that when you install the valves you can turn the heat down – under powered radiators only means you will have the valves open full but the room will never be warm enough.

Calculate BTU

The number you need to calculate is the BTU. British Thermal Unit.

This is a calculation of how much heat you need to heat 1 pound of water by 1 degree farenheight. There are a few explanations of this, just check out wikipedia to start, but really all you need to know is calculate the BTU number using a calculator like the one below and that’s the number you quote when you order your radiators.

Radiator Size Calculator

Grab your tape measure and start filling in the form for an easy calculation

https://www.theradiatorcompany.co.uk/heat-output-calculator

An amazing spa bathroom for any age

December 2, 2019
Jola Piesakowska Buildmumahouse bathroom sink ageproof bathroom

I was at a location house a few weeks ago, owned by interiors stylist Catherine Woram and architectural designer Michael Bains. I was captivated how beautiful the entire house was. Every room. But it was the bathrooms that did it for me – I need one of these! Each bathroom was full of beautiful, clever details all in perfect harmony. A perfect retreat from the stresses and strains of the world, your own private spa.

small moroccan bathroom

The flat whiteness of the walls and painted floor are fresh and uplifting. The huge over mantel mirror bounces light all around and by painting the ornate frame white it looks perfect over the basins. The sense of light in this room is perfect for anyone with weakened eyesight: details are crisp and defined.

Catherine Woram has used an shabby and ornate console table as a basin stand. Its fun and its chic. Complementing the shabby paintwork and wooden top is a rustic copper basin.. and a very modern chrome u bend. It looks fantastic and this basin stand is in fact ideal for anyone who needs to pull up a stool when using the sink. Wouldn’t it be perfect if an ornate basin stand like this was wheelchair friendly too!

The basin and tap styling is Moroccan French rustic chateau meets modern, sleek chrome. These levered taps are easy to use for anyone with reduced mobility, the narrow console table/basin stand also means that you wouldn’t need to stretch forward to reach them. This is exactly what Build Mum a House is all about. You shouldn’t need to compromise the look of your home for ease of use.

TAPS AND MIXER

White floor boards, pale flat greys shades, chandeliers, copper basins. I took some photos on my phone to try and capture the magic… and then as I turned to leave the room I noticed the bathroom door lock. Absolutely beautiful, inspired, on theme AND completely up my street.

In 1970 I was 8. I got stuck in a Hayling Island beach car park toilet. As I had gone to leave, the catch on the big brass mechanism was so fiddly, the old penny dropped down inside the brass mechanism.  I was left behind in the locked cubicle. I wailed. Finally, a very kind lady heard me and put another penny in the lock. Released, I ungraciously ran out, humiliated, in tears, to join my sister who had already got back into our parents’ car!

That’s why I like a nice and easy privacy lock on a bathroom door.

It’s not about lack of mobility and everything with being a bit clumsy. I am not alone on this one. I know I’m not.

And do you know what this bathroom features as a door lock? It’s light and easy to use, large handle that is good for a weak grip and very pretty. The lock on the door is a Moroccan Aldrop and latch. No, I didn’t know they were called that either. This is a very nice decorated version of a metal sliding bolt, that you can see when you wander round the souks and admire the ancient Moorish buildings and their intricate front doors.

bathroom lock

Buildmumahouse is all about finding chic interiors that are perfect for age proof living, for aging at home, for anyone with mobility issues, young or old. This beautiful bathroom is perfect, it’s a visual feast and it addresses many practical issues. Proof that a beautiful interior can be ageproof.

If you would like to see more of my photos fof inspirational interiors then follow me and go to my Buildmumahouse Instagram account, click here  And for more well designed and easy to use bathroom locks go to my bathroom Pinterest boards at Buildmumahouse.