Monthly Archives

April 2017

How to Make a Mood Board…the EASY Way.

April 25, 2017

The last few days I’ve been feeling full of optimism and excitement to start new projects.. and finish half abandoned ones. A mood board is the first step in any design project.

I’m going to take you through an easy way to make up a mood board using office WORD on a Mac or a PC, an every day piece of office software. If you can’t use Photoshop or Canva or Pic collage don’t worry, follow these easy steps.

Years ago, designers used to cut pictures out of magazines, take photos and cut out the prints and stick them on a piece of white or black board. For this mood board I will show you how to use your phone, Pinterest, Instagram, Google and WORD to put it all together. We’re making an easy mood board. No Photoshop No special software.

A mood board helps you can decide what feeling you are trying to capture in a room or an advert or a piece of branding and helps you share it / sell it to your client. Your mood board builds your design’s story and helps you take your client on that journey reaching a decision and on board with a plan.

I’ve worked in branding, tv design and commercials for over 20 years and I make up mood boards as the first thing I do – before I design anything. The mood board helps you decide on the mood to convey. My clients are looking for a way to express their product’s message and speak to the their audience. Whether you are designing a brand, creating an advert or designing a room’s interior, your thought processes are the same.

If you are making over a room your client might be a paying client, a friend, your family, your partner, your mum. In fact anyone who will use this room and moan about it if they don’t like it!

This guide will help you make up a mood board in WORD easily, you won’t be daunted making up a few versions to give you and your client options and help you get everyone on board.

Print out your boards A4 on your inkjet printer, talk through them and discuss, mooch over with a friend, client, your family or your partner and when you decide on the mood and  colourway take that board round the shops with you.

Remember a mood board when planning an interior is a starting point so that you can all agree this is the direction you want to take.. before you fall in love with that special lamp and you’re the only one who likes it.

Your mood boards will make decisions about how to achieve the feeling your are looking for in a room and actual final decision of what you are going to buy will come later.

Step 1. Decide on the Mood and Corresponding Colour

First question What mood do I want to aim for and in which room?

And the answer: A bright sunny happy family Kitchen.

Start to look around you for inspiration to capture the mood, go for a walk, take lots of pictures on your phone of colourful things that catch you eye.

Go home and look back on your pictures.  Think about what each color means to you and how you feel when you look at that picture. Pick out the best picture of the day and post it to Instagram write a few words about why you like it.

Inspiration, mood board, Buildmumahouse Instagram the day, #happy #Spring #fresh

Inspiration all around me – I posted this on Instagram as my shot of the day #happy #Spring #fresh

 

I picked out a picture of some delicate narcissus because they made me feel full of hope and positive for Spring. Looking back on my past posts I found a similar picture of primroses. Thinking about it the pale soft yellow and the white petals summed up a feeling of gentle happiness, fresh mornings and optimism.

#Spring # yellow #white #happy, Buildmumahouse instagram,

Yellow and White Narcissus #Spring # yellow #white #happy

This is what made me happy. Looking at my Instagram account I noticed that people responded well to these pictures and they both got lots of likes.

I decided that yellow would be my #happy colour. But what kind of yellow? Soft mustard, egg yellow? Taking photos I began to notice yellow everywhere I looked and I began curating my pictures choosing the best and Instagrammed those images.

Apart from my curated collection on Instagram I had taken loads of pictures not only of things in the street but also furniture, I began to notice yellow everywhere I looked: in cafes, kitchen shops the more I looked the more I found yellow things.

Buildmumahouse Instagram feed, #yellow, #happy, Jola Piesakowska, how to make a mood board

Buildmumahouse Instagram feed #yellow #happy

After a few days I could look back on my collection of pictures on Instagram and I could see how I just didn’t like some tones of yellow for my happy kitchen , some were too warm, they sucked lightness in, mustardy was too sophisticated and acidic yellow glowed too much.

Apart from my Instagram pictures, I had taken loads of snaps in shops, shop windows of yellow interiors items

#how to make a mood board #yellow # happy #inspiration

Use your phone as an inspiration note book. Take snaps taken in shops, in shop windows: these give you an idea of what’s available and what’s trending this season.

 

Step 3 Google and Pinterest it

Next step start looking everywhere else and start to focus on your shade of yellow. Make a Pinterest board and do a Pinterest search – “yellow” “kitchens” and pin as much as you can be really free with your pins. The benefit of Pinterest is that you preserve a link to the source of the picture and you can pin lots of pictures really quickly. The down side is that it needs curating to convey the mood that your mood board is going to tell.

Buildmumahouse, HAPPY, inspiration interiors, interiors,

Buildmumahouse HAPPY interiors

Do a Google search based on names of shops. I Googled Next as I know that they have a good selection of homewares, paints and décor. Within the Next website I then searched yellow.

 

Step 4 Create a Folder on your Computer and Use Screen Grab to Fill it up.

I have now decided on your colour scheme- yellow and white

It will be an accent colour to a white kitchen

This will create a happy, fresh, mood. Not overpowering and not too dark.

I made a folder on my computer and started to store screen grabs of my Google searches, of my favourite Pinterest images – kitchen décor items that matched my colour choice and that I really liked. And anything that told the mood story.

 

Step 5 Make a Mood Board in WORD

At this point I decided that I was looking to capture the mood of a happy bright fresh kitchen with a fun family feel. The mood board I was starting was going to tell a story to my client

You know what you thing works now you need to get your client to understand this idea and feel what you feel.

Open a new document.

File    Page Set Up     Landscape

Set the page up to be a landscape image

 

 

 

 

 

Start inserting images: File   Image    Insert.

Keep them small, Crop   Shrink

Start telling the story with your visual prompts:

  • Key words
  • Your inspiration images
  • Examples of items that can help set the scene – cushions, curtains etc etc
  • Keep to your colour pallet and keep to images that support the mood and the story.
  • Keep it simple and to 1 page
  • Compress all the images
  • Save
  • Save as a pdf to make it a smaller file
Made in Word a mood board #happy #yellow #and #white, buildmumahouse mood board, Jola Piesakowska mood board happy

Made in WORD a mood board #happy #yellow #and #white

A mood board is your way of exploring a particular mood and explaining it to other people, your client. It’s a way for telling the mood story and use it before you start to choose what furnishings and decor items you will use.

Use autosave so that you save as you go – images are big files until you compress them down. Make a selection of mood boards in different colours so that you can explore this with you client before you make any décor choices. But most importantly: Make it in WORD and it’s simple and straightforward.

Go over to Buildmumahouse Pinterest boards and look through the selection of HAPPY interiors inspiration. Take a look at Buildmumahouse Instagram for my yellow colour inspiration. Leave a comment if you have any questions.

 

 

Buildmumahouse Guide: How to make Roman blinds?

April 19, 2017

I’m taking you through a step-by-step guide to making Roman blinds with or without a kit. Roman blinds transform your windows, are surprisingly quick to make and use very little fabric compared to curtains so you can really splurge on the quality or the fabric design or work to a tight budget. They can be used on the own or with curtains for a decadent layered effect. Roman blinds can be lined or sheer, thermal or blackout. Either way they are energy efficient even with double glazing and give you instant privacy.

A pleated or Roman blind folds into soft accordion pleats when it is drawn up and hangs straight when down. Roman blinds give your window a simple classic elegance and also make the most of subtle fabric designs.

There are two ways of making a Roman blind: with or without a kit.

Without a kit the blind is held in an up position by securing the cord to a cleat. Using a kit the blind pulls up using a chain loop, which is good for heavy and wide blinds. A kit can also be safer with children as there is not a long cord hanging down when the blind is pulled up. With a kit the blind will sit in any position you pull it to and the metal headrail will only need cutting to size and adjusting.

Making a Roman Blind without a Kit.

This is the most diy and the cheapest option. Making your Roman blind the old fashioned way.

Materials for a Roman Blind without a kit:

  1. Wooden batten depth 25mm and width 50mm measured to the width of your window recess (A)
  2. Velcro tape 25mm wide the same length as the batten
  3. A staple gun
  4. 4 screw-in eyelet hooks or pulleys
  5. Cord. Calculate 3 x 4 times the drop of the blind, at least
  6. A cleat
  7. A breakaway cord connector
  8. One length of narrow a flat bottom bar: a batten about 0.5 x 1.27cm for the bottom of the blind or a flat aluminium or plastic bar 2.5cm wide from Merrick Day
  9. Narrow tape with pockets for rods – Roman blind tape
  10. Roman blind rods or dowelling to fit into Roman blind tape
  11. 12mm split brass or plastic rings for cording available from www.merrick-day.com
  12. Matching sewing thread
  13. Tailor’s chalk
  14. Sewing kit including big sharp scissors and long pins
  15. Steam iron and ironing board
  16. Sewing machine

Measuring up Roman Blinds

  1. Attach the wooden baton to the top of the window recess and measure up the inside of the window. Staple the furry half of the 25mm Velcro tape to the front face of the batten.
roman blind, how to make a roman blind, measure a roamn blind, buildmumahouse

Measure the inside of the window

2. Measure the inside of the window for the width and the drop.

Use this measurement for the lining, if you plan on using one.

 

 

 

 

 

Seam allowances

Add 2.5cm on each side of width for side hems. Add 1cm for top hem and 5cm at the bottom hem. Cut your fabric to size on the straight grain. Lay the lining on to the back of the curtain fabric covering the window area using this photo as a placement guide. Pin in place.

 

 

 

3. Cut your fabric looking out for pattern repeats, its nice to get a shape to be centred. Press the side seams in to place. The side seams are double so turn in on each side 0.5cm, press in place, then turn in 2.5cm. Press, pin in place then stitch. Now turn down the top edge and press.

Turn in side seams and top seams.

4. Press the side seams in to place. The side seams are double so turn in on each side 0.5cm, press in place then turn in 2cm. Press then stitch. Now turn down the top edge 1cm and press.

5. Sew the Velcro tape to the back of the blind, 0.5cm from the top edge covering the raw edge. Sew both edges of the Velcro tape. This is going to attach to the Velcro stapled onto the batten.

For lined blinds make sure the lining is flat and all edges are all covered into these seams and attached behind the Velcro.

Turn in side seams and top seams.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

6. Make the bottom hem, turn over 1cm and press, turn it up again to make a 4cm pocket to fit your dowelling or batten.

For lined blinds make sure that your lining is lying flat, tucked in neatly and covered by this seam.

roman blinds marking out folds

 

 

 

7. Work out the width of your pleats so that they are even across the blind, 10cm is an average width or divide by 6. Mark each pleat with tailors chalk. Sew Roman Blind tape across the back of each pleat, one by one. Insert the rod or dowelling in each tape pocket.

This tape has a guide for the split rings, push a split brass curtain between the tape and the guide. Line up the rings  to the top of the blind.

 

8. Trim the rods 2cm shorter than the width of the blind. Insert the rods and the bottom batten, slip stitch by hand the ends of these “pockets”.

9. On each rod pocket mark the centre point of the blind and slip a brass ring in place through the guide in the tape. Repeat 5cm in from each side edge of the blind on each pocket.

10. Line up three of the the screw-in eyelets or pulleys on the top batten with the rings attached to the blind.
Fix the fourth eyelet or pulley to the right of the blind on the window recess. Lower down attach a cleat and an acorn near the bottom of the cord.
11. Hang the blind: Attach firmly the Velcro strip on the top of the blind to the matching Velcro strip on the batten.

12. For the cording stage I found this drawing – it explains it all really well.

c) Michael A Hill www.idealhome.com

Starting at the bottom ring with a knot, thread the cord up vertically to match the corresponding eyelet on the batten and over to the eyelet on the side of the frame, down to the cleat. Repeat this with each row.

 

 

The cleat should be positioned as high as possible so its well out of the way of children. Consider attaching a breakaway cord connector at the end of the cords and for safety don’t knot all three cords together to form a loop.

If you buy a Roman Blind Kit choose one that is fully child safe and that the control chains are adjustable length, not a continuous loop. Breakaway string controls and Parts can be purchased from www.merrick-day.com

buildmumahouse, interiors, lifestyle, windows

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

What Now?

It’s important that you do visit my Youtube channel to watch the safety film about Roman Blinds, especially if you have children or if kids visit your home.

Roman Blind supplies can be found at www.merrick-day.com

Roman Blind Kits can be bought at Merrick Day

murtra_deluxe_roman_kit_instructions

Or from Terry’s Fabric’s https://www.terrysfabrics.co.uk/

Terrys_Cassette-Roman-Blind-Kit_Fitting

So now you have been introduced to Roman blinds and how to make them, go over to Buildmumahouse Pinterest for lots of inspirational fabrics and looks. If you would like to consider other window decor ideas visit Buildmumahouse guides to making curtains or my blog post about automated roller blinds.

If you have any tips, questions and would like to share your Roman blind projects leave me a message on my comments board. Love to hear from you.